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Abulcasis-The Father Of Modern Surgery  

Jun 8, 2008 

Abu al-Qasim Khalaf ibn al-Abbas Al-Zahrawi (936 - 1013), also known in the West as Abulcasis, was an Andalusian-Arab physician, surgeon, chemist, cosmetologist, and scientist.

He is considered the father of modern surgery, and as Islam's greatest medieval surgeon, whose comprehensive medical texts shaped both Islamic and European surgical procedures up until the Renaissance. His greatest contribution to history is the Kitab al-Tasrif, a thirty-volume encyclopedia of medical practices.

Abu al-Qasim was born in the city of El Zahra, six miles northwest of Córdoba,
Spain. He was descended from the Ansar Arab tribe who settled earlier in Spain.


[image]


Abu al-Qasim was a
court physician to the Andalusian caliph Al-Hakam II. He devoted his entire life and genius to the advancement of medicine as a whole and surgery in particular. His best work was the Kitab al-Tasrif. It is a medical encyclopaedia spanning 30 volumes which included sections on surgery, medicine, orthopaedics, ophthalmology, pharmacology, nutrition etc.

In the 14th century, French surgeon Guy de Chauliac quoted al-Tasrif over 200 times. Pietro Argallata (d. 1453) described Abu al-Qasim as
"without doubt the chief of all surgeons".

In an earlier work, he is credited to be
the first to describe ectopic pregnancy in 963, in those days a fatal affliction. Abu Al-Qasim's influence continued for at least five centuries, extending into the Renaissance, evidenced by al-Tasrif's frequent reference by French surgeon Jaques Delechamps (1513-1588).

In his Al-Tasrif (The Method of Medicine), he introduced
his famous collection of over 200 surgical instruments. Many of these instruments were never used before by any previous surgeons.

http://prep4md.blogspot.com/2008/06/abulcasis-father-of-modern-surgery.html 

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